Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics-Hispanic Americans & Heart Disease - Facts & Statistics

Like many other Hispanic women, Eva spent her time as a caregiver for her family rather than thinking about herself. The result? Thirteen years of an ignored heart murmur. Many Hispanic women have said that they more likely to take preventative action for their families when it comes to heart health. However, they end up completely ignoring their own health in the process, and these acts of selflessness can become deadly.

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

A, Researchers said that they did not know whether ancestry or environment explained the difference. This acceleration may not necessarily be a healthy one. Among participants who had high rates of risk factors for cardiac dysfunction:. Myrna knew firsthand the challenges that face Hispanic women: Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics take on the role of caregiver superwoman, catering to the needs of everyone but themselves. Acculturation may increase nutrition health disparities in Hispanics and has been consistently associated with less-healthy dietary patterns, poorer quality diet and obesity. The process can be slow or accelerated. In LVSD, Cadiovacular left ventricle, the heart's largest chamber, does not push blood out to the body as forcefully as it should. Duration Digital vaginal stimulation residence in the US was not.

Eda tube slip wowowee. Here are some stats:

Specific combinations of individual risk factors by sex are shown in eTable 5 and eTable Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, when patient prefers to speak Spanish. In general, more acculturated participants had markedly higher rates of current smoking and obesity compared with others. Use our resources to help members of your community reduce their risk factors for heart disease. In the Penthouse pet randy diaz States, it is the number one cause of death claiminglives each year. Circulation ; ee In fact, in Back to top Article Information. Bring this list of questions to your next appointment. Still, teasing out the reasons isn't easy. Hispanics have lower deaths than whites from most of the 10 leading causes of death with three exceptions—more deaths from diabetes and chronic liver disease, and similar numbers of deaths from kidney diseases. Top of Page. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of adverse CVD risk profiles and self-reported CHD and stroke were calculated for the total cohort by age group sex-adjusted onlysex age-adjusted onlySES, acculturation, Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics lifestyle factors.

Skip Navigation.

  • Hispanic and Latino Americans face higher risks of heart disease than White Americans because of high rates of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes.
  • About 1 in 6 people living in the US are Hispanic almost 57 million.
  • Your racial and ethnic heritage may influence your heart disease risk, but lifestyle habits play a bigger role.

Like many other Hispanic women, Eva spent her time as a caregiver for her family rather than thinking about herself. The result? Thirteen years of an ignored heart murmur. Many Hispanic women have said that they more likely to take preventative action for their families when it comes to heart health. However, they end up completely ignoring their own health in the process, and these acts of selflessness can become deadly. And the statistics above are proof.

Myrna, unlike most Hispanic women, was proactive about her health. Heart disease shared a long history with her family. But as she grew older, she became determined to stop the disease that claimed the lives of too many family members for so long.

Myrna knew firsthand the challenges that face Hispanic women: they take on the role of caregiver superwoman, catering to the needs of everyone but themselves. And that catering largely has to do with food. For Hispanic and Latina women, cooking for family is an act of love that can involve unhealthy pork products and lard.

And the more they assimilate to American traditions, the quality of their diets really deteriorate. As a Hispanic woman, remember that your commitment to your family cannot be met unless you make a commitment to yourself first. You come in last. Today, Eva, Myrna, Migdalia and Maricela are more committed to their families than ever before.

Just like these ladies, you can reverse this trend in your own family — and in your own life. Being born Hispanic does not have to be synonymous with heart disease, or death. But in order to do that, you have to share the passion and love you have for your family with yourself. About Heart Disease in Women. Latest Research. Living with Cardiovascular Disease.

Preventing Cardiovascular Disease. Real Women. Signs and Symptoms. Here are some stats: On average, Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years earlier than non-Hispanics. Only 1 in 3 Hispanic women are aware that heart disease is their No. Why Hispanic women?

Clin Chem. Circulation ; ee View Metrics. Moreover, more acculturated participants—particularly those born in the United States—were significantly more likely to have prevalent CHD and stroke. Am J Med. In the United States, nearly half of all black adults have some form of cardiovascular disease, compared with about one-third of all white adults. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of CHD and stroke were significantly higher among men, older participants aged years compared with younger , those who were second- or third-generation immigrants, and those who preferred English Table 3.

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics. Browse by Topic

Cancers related to infections cervical, stomach, and liver are more common among Hispanics born in another country. Social factors may play a major role in Hispanic health.

Among Hispanics living in the US: About 1 in 3 has not completed high school; About 1 in 4 lives below the poverty line; About 1 in 3 does not speak English well. What Can Be Done. Federal government is Helping eligible Hispanics get insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act. Working to build capacity in communities to use community health workers promotores de salud to help improve the health of Hispanic communities.

Leveraging existing programs to improve community health services and access to preventive care. Making efforts to better represent all Hispanics in national health surveillance data and research studies and use the data to help improve Hispanic health. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, when patient prefers to speak Spanish. Community Health Workers promotores de salud can Use resources that have been developed to educate the Hispanic community about health risks and preventive services.

Everyone can Sign up for health insurance, if eligible, through the Affordable Care Act External regardless of whether or not you have a pre-existing condition and find out if you are eligible for cost savings. Talk to your doctor or other healthcare professional about which cancer screening tests to get and how often, especially if you have a family history of cancer. Follow-up on any abnormal results.

Make a strong effort to follow proven health tips such as quitting smoking, staying on medicine to control blood pressure and cholesterol, and maintaining a healthy weight by taking at least one brisk minute walk, 3 times a day, 5 days a week. Learn about diabetes and how to prevent type 2 diabetes. Eat a healthy diet that is low in salt, low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and rich in fresh fruits and vegetables.

Science Behind the Issue. Related Pages. Get Email Updates. To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Email Address. What's this? Related Links.

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.

Household-level response rate was Seventy percent had lived in the United States for 10 or more years. Sex-specific and other characteristics are described in eTable 1 and eTable 2. Prevalence of obesity was highest among Puerto Rican women Table 2.

For example, among men, those of Central American background had the highest mean level of total cholesterol, and those of Central and South American backgrounds had higher mean levels of LDL cholesterol compared with others. Among women, those of Cuban and Central American background had higher mean total cholesterol levels than other groups; Cuban women also had the highest average level of LDL cholesterol. Use of antihypertensive medications was highest among Dominican men; in women, antihypertensive medication use was higher among those of Puerto Rican and Dominican backgrounds.

Dominican and Mexican men and Puerto Rican women had the highest rate of antihyperglycemic medication use eTable 3 and eTable 4. When analyses were repeated on the whole sample without exclusions other than missing data for the major CVD risk factors, prevalences were almost identical to those in Table 2. Prevalence of 3 or more risk factors was highest among Puerto Rican men and lowest among South American men.

Prevalence of 3 or more risk factors was highest among Puerto Rican women and lowest among South American women. Specific combinations of individual risk factors by sex are shown in eTable 5 and eTable 6. A significantly higher proportion of men than women, and those aged 65 to 74 years compared with younger persons had 3 or more risk factors Table 3. In general, participants with lower income or education had higher rates of smoking, diabetes, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia eTable 8.

In sensitivity analyses excluding Puerto Rican participants the most acculturated group who also had the highest prevalence of multiple risk factors , the magnitude of difference in prevalence of 3 or more risk factors by acculturation level was slightly lower; findings remained significant although level of significance was diminished.

In general, more acculturated participants had markedly higher rates of current smoking and obesity compared with others. Additionally, participants with lower physical activity levels and less healthy diets had higher prevalence of 3 or more CVD risk factors.

Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of CHD and stroke were significantly higher among men, older participants aged years compared with younger , those who were second- or third-generation immigrants, and those who preferred English Table 3. Additionally, CHD prevalence was significantly higher among participants who had resided in the United States 10 or more years, and stroke prevalence was significantly higher among participants with lower family income and those born in the United States.

Unweighted cell counts corresponding to weighted prevalences in eTables are presented in eTables In age-adjusted analyses model 1 , all individual CVD risk factors were associated with higher odds of prevalent CHD Figure 2 ; associations were especially strong for hypertension and diabetes. Associations of CVD risk factors with self-reported CHD were attenuated and in some cases lost statistical significance, with additional adjustment for other CVD risk factors model 2 or for variables in model 3.

Associations of risk factors with prevalent stroke were less consistent Figure 2. In age-adjusted analyses model 1 , hypertension and diabetes mellitus were strongly associated with prevalent stroke in both sexes; high cholesterol and obesity were significantly associated and cigarette smoking was borderline significantly associated with prevalent stroke among women only. With further adjustment for other CVD risk factors model 2 , the association of hypertension with prevalent stroke was attenuated but remained significant in women and borderline significant in men, diabetes remained significantly associated with stroke in men, and smoking was borderline significantly associated with stroke in women only.

With additional adjustment for variables in model 3, diabetes and hypertension remained positively associated with stroke among men and women, respectively. Prevalence of individual major CVD risk factors varied markedly across Hispanic background groups. Moreover, as compared with first-generation participants born outside of the United States , participants who were US-born were more likely to report a history of CHD and stroke and to have multiple CVD risk factors.

Additionally, higher prevalence of CVD was associated with longer duration of residence in the United States and greater acculturation. However, findings on intergroup variation in individual CVD risk factor prevalence have been inconsistent. For example, women of Puerto Rican background had the highest prevalence of each of the major CVD risk factors, and Mexican men and women both had high rates of diabetes.

Studies in diverse Latin American countries have demonstrated similar variations in prevalence of CVD risk factors. Moreover, more acculturated participants—particularly those born in the United States—were significantly more likely to have prevalent CHD and stroke. Findings here are limited to self-reported information on prevalent CHD and stroke possibly biased by access to health care and the cross-sectional nature of the data.

However, the data were age-standardized to the year US population to allow for comparisons with observations from national surveys, and protocols used were similar to those of other epidemiological studies. Corresponding Author: Martha L. Author Contributions: Drs Daviglus and Talavera had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Drs Daviglus and Talavera, as co—first authors, contributed equally to this article. Dr Cai reported having consulted for Outcomes Research Solutions. Dr Gellman reported receiving book royalties from Springer.

No other disclosures were reported. Role of the Sponsor: The funding agency had a role in the design and conduct of the study; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and in the review and approval of the manuscript. Daviglus, Aida L. Giachello, Kiang Liu. Nutrition Reading Center.

University of Minnesota: John H. Graham Barr, Paul Enright. A complete list of staff and investigators was published in Ann Epidemiol. All Rights Reserved. Figure 1. View Large Download. Figure 2. Table 1. Table 2. Table 3. US Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, Heart disease and stroke statistics: update: a report from the American Heart Association. Acculturation and socioeconomic position as predictors of coronary calcification in a multiethnic sample. Association of acculturation levels and prevalence of diabetes in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis MESA.

Diabetes Care. Risk of cardiovascular disease in first and second generation Mexican-Americans. J Immigr Minor Health. Acculturation and diabetes among Hispanics: evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Public Health Rep. Acculturation and smoking patterns among Hispanics: a review. Am J Prev Med. Hispanic paradox in biological risk profiles. Am J Public Health. Am J Epidemiol. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Prevalence of and risk factors for subclinical cardiovascular disease in selected US Hispanic ethnic groups: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Ethn Dis. Ann Epidemiol. Estimation of the concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in plasma, without use of the preparative ultracentrifuge.

Clin Chem. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: the evidence report [NIH Publication No. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. American Diabetes Association. Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus. Is the risk of coronary heart disease lower in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic whites?

Heart Disease - The Office of Minority Health

Hispanic and Latino Americans face higher risks of heart disease than White Americans because of high rates of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Although the statistics above paint a troubling picture of Hispanic Americans and heart disease, all is not lost! There are three simple things you can do to reduce your risk for heart disease, starting today. Get more facts about Hispanic Americans and heart disease from:. This information is not a substitute for medical care. Please consult a doctor or health care provider.

Talk to your doctor about your personal risk factors for heart disease. Bring this list of questions to your next appointment. Help us Close the Gap! Use our resources to help members of your community reduce their risk factors for heart disease. Use our assessment tool to find out if you're at risk for developing heart disease. American Heart Association. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke. Updated April Accessed March 12, Heart disease and stroke statistics - update.

A report from the American Heart Association. Circulation ; ee National Diabetes Statistics, Boston Scientific is dedicated to transforming lives through innovative medical solutions that improve the health of patients around the world. All rights reserved. Review questions to ask your doctor. Study diabetes symptoms now. Visita Heartistry. Get involved.

Assess your risk now.

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics

Cadiovascular disease in latino hispanics