How to strip a painted table-Best Way to Remove Paint From Wood Furniture

As wood surfaces in your home age, their finishes can begin to flake or fade away. Restore wood furniture, trim, baseboards and banisters by first stripping them down to the wood. Follow the steps below to find out how. Work in a well-ventilated area such as your open garage or on an outdoor deck or patio. Make sure your work area is dry and dust-free.

How to strip a painted table

How to strip a painted table

How to strip a painted table

You can see a great product HERE. Where yo Find It W. Before you begin, use the shopping list below to uncheck the tools Porn star babes gallery already have to complete this project. I bet it would look amazing with a coat of clear wax followed by a coat of white wax. Use tabl respirator with a chemical cartridge How to strip a painted table indoor work with paint strippers. Apply the stripper with an acceptable paint brush; usually, the instructions on the stripper will tell you which kind to use. Most likely, though, it will remove some paint but not all of it. SmartStrip: A paste with a frosting-like consistency that can be brushed, rolled, or sprayed on.

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Introduction There's probably an old dresser, chair, or table you've sequestered in a dark corner of your basement or attic that's covered with cracked and blistered paint. With its new showroom finish, the table looks might look too good to eat off of, but there's no need Pictures of gray tiger striped cats cover up the wood with a tablecloth. Maxwell does his work on a lipped metal tray that collects the extra stripper into a paint can; he reuses the stripper until it How to strip a painted table. If the stripper dries, you can reactivate it by brushing on a little more, and How to strip a painted table scraping it all off. Whether the piece is a family heirloom or just something you picked up at a garage sale, you can remove the paint and turn it into a usable piece of furniture. After it had thoroughly dried, Maxwell gave the table a finish sanding. Refinishers Despite what some labels suggest, refinishers, or removers, are strippers, although they only work on shellac or lacquer. Shopping for Stripper Most paint stores and home centers stock dozens of liquid- and paste-type chemical strippers. For tough paints, Maxwell carefully scratches the surface of the finish to help the stripper get down to the wood. In many cases, stripper will dry within 10 minutes, making it extra difficult to remove. If you find yourself prying or scraping off the finish though, put on more stripper or you'll damage the wood.

I tossed around the idea of completely stripping the wood, but it made me tired just thinking about it.

  • It has to be done correctly, or your job will likely turn out very poorly.
  • Sometimes ugly is only skin deep.
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Finding out which wood stripping method to use, and how to contain the debris, makes a messy job cleaner, safer, and more effective. Everyone knows that the simplest way to rejuvenate a tired surface is to put on a fresh coat of paint. Eventually, however, all new paint becomes old paint. Whether it cracks and blisters or just forms a lumpy blanket of pigments and binders, it begs to come off.

The ideal way to start over is to strip furniture of the old stuff and begin with a baby-smooth, bare wood surface. Getting there is tedious, dirty work, no doubt, but our start-to-finish guide will help you manage the mess and choose the best paint strippers, scrapers and techniques to get the results you want. He recommends finding a hidden spot, such as inside a drawer or closet, and using a scraper to shave a test patch through the various paint layers. If the bottom layer is paint, it's a good sign that the wood is unworthy of stain.

It's always better to determine beforehand that a job is too big, complicated, or dangerous to tackle yourself. In that case, you have a couple of options. Send it out: If the pieces you want to strip are easily removable such as doors, windows, or furniture and feature intricate detailing like mantel-pieces or stair parts , consider sending them out to a professional with a dip tank; pros use these special vats to soak entire pieces in liquid paint removers for faster, more thorough results.

Hire in: If you have a house's worth of trim or siding that must be stripped bare quickly, or if you have lead-laden paint and can't remove it safely, bring in a qualified pro to do it on-site. Visit the EPA's website for certified lead-removal experts.

Heaters use high temperatures to soften varnishes or multiple layers of paint so that the gunk can easily be removed with a scraper. They minimize dust and can lift years of paint. Chemical strippers are liquids, gels, or pastes that dissolve paint. No dust. No paint chips. They're ideal for fine details, awkward shapes, and hitting spots you may have missed with a heat gun. Sanders, including power sanding disks and clapboard sanders, grind away paint.

They're great for large, flat exterior surfaces but, unless hooked up to a vacuum to capture dust, ill-advised for indoor work and anything with lead-based paint. Heat is a tried-and-true method for softening thick layers of paint on flat surfaces or in tight spaces.

The trick is to find the right temperature; too low and the job takes forever, too high and you could create harmful vapors, char the wood—or even set the house on fire. Heat guns look like high-powered hair dryers and blast hot, concentrated air through a nozzle to loosen paint.

Most models have high and low settings, but burns and fires can result even on the lowest setting if you let the gun rest in one place for too long. Infrared devices use infrared rays to heat up and loosen the bond between paint and its substrate without generating noise or dust. They work quickly; a second blast can soften decades of paint. The heat draws moisture from the wood, improving its ability to hold new paint.

But these tools are bulky see example, above and hard to use in tight spaces. Steam strippers use water vapor to soften paint without heating it above degrees F, eliminating fire risks. And the condensation minimizes dust and fumes. On the downside, the process can generate a lot of moisture and saturate wood. Heat stripping is like a tango between the hand holding the heater and the one with the scraper.

Hover the device over the surface. When the paint bubbles, slowly move the heater along and try to develop a rhythm so that you're scraping and heating in unison. Keep a metal paint tray handy for when you take a break and need to set the device down. If you're going to use a chemical stripper, know that anything that eats paint is dangerous and that doing the job without methylene chloride see above will be safer but slower.

These wood stripping products contain less toxic, less noxious ingredients and remove both latex and oil paints. SmartStrip: A paste with a frosting-like consistency that can be brushed, rolled, or sprayed on. Clings well to vertical surfaces. Active ingredient: Benzyl alcohol Strength: One coat removes up to 15 layers of paint. Dwell time: 3 to 24 hours Removal: Scrape off the paint, scrub off the residue with a wet nylon brush, and rinse with water.

This paste works with a paper cover to control evaporation. Ideal for lead paint and masonry, but can stain furniture woods. Active ingredient: Lye Strength: Up to 30 layers of paint can come off as easily as stripping sheets off a bed.

Dwell time: 12 to 24 hours Removal: Peel off the paper and scrub the surface with a wet brush; let dry thoroughly, then apply a neutralizing solution. Dwell time: 30 minutes to 24 hours Removal: Scrape off the paint with a plastic scraper, and use an abrasive pad and mineral spirits to remove any lingering residue.

Years ago, if you needed a fast-acting chemical paint stripper, you chose a product that contained a seriously noxious chemical called methylene chloride also called dichloromethane, or DCM , cranked up the fan, and got the job done quickly. Generally speaking, the faster a chemical eats through paint and finish, the more toxic it is, and DCM is fast—paint starts to bubble in minutes. But this paint stripper is also dangerous.

Prolonged exposure to DCM, through the lungs or skin, has been linked to liver damage, cancer, and even death. The vapors can overwhelm air-purifying respirators, and just a few whiffs can leave you wheezing and dizzy. Europe banned it for residential use in While DCM-containing paint strippers are still widely sold in the U. Our advice: Check your labels and steer clear.

No paint-stripping endeavor is complete without an arsenal of scrapers to usher away softened paint. After that, replace or resharpen the blades.

Nearly 90 percent of homes built before have some paint laden with this toxic metal. Although its use went into steep decline after , lead-based paint wasn't banned in the U. Here's how to detect it. A bright red color indicates lead is present. Lab test: Scrape a table-spoon of chips into a bag and send them to a lab for testing.

Call a pro: For a few hundred dollars, a licensed lead inspector will conduct an X-ray fluorescence test to identify the amount of lead present in all the painted surfaces in your home.

Lead is nasty. Exposure can raise your blood pressure, stress your nervous system, and damage your memory, among other risks. It's especially toxic to children, whose developing brains are more sensitive to its effects. Find more useful tips at www2.

Skip canvas drop cloths in favor of 6-mil plastic sheeting, which won't trap fine grit or let chemicals seep through. Extend the sheeting at least 6 feet beyond the work area and overlap and tape the edges.

To help avoid slips and absorb spills, cover the plastic with a layer of newspaper or contractor's paper. Remove or cover items you do not plan to strip. If using chemicals, mask hinges and other hardware you can't remove with solvent-resistant painter's tape, like ScotchBlue.

If working with heat, protect adjacent surfaces with aluminum-foil tape or a metal paint shield. Use 6-mil plastic sheeting and duct tape to seal off the workspace from the rest of the house. Dust control: If working indoors, cover air vents in your workspace to keep dust and debris from circulating throughout the house. Gear for handling fumes, paint chips, and caustic solvents 1.

Put on clear wraparound safety glasses to guard against splashes, dust, and flying debris. Use a respirator with a chemical cartridge for indoor work with paint strippers. Wear disposable coveralls or old pants and a long-sleeve shirt to protect your skin. With chemical strippers, wear green nitrile or black butyl rubber gloves as recommended on the manufacturer's MSDS. Opt for construction-grade gloves for scraping and heat stripping. Wear disposable booties, and contain dust and dirt by taking them off whenever you leave the work area.

Some simple tools can help you remove paint from wood rails and other intricate details. Dental picks make it easy to dig out the remaining specks of debris that hide in nooks and crannies. Sanding cords work like dental floss to remove residue from crevices in turned columns and spindles. Old credit cards or gift cards can be repurposed as custom scrapers by cutting them to match the surface you need to strip.

Teaspoons and tablespoons are handy for scraping paint from concave or convex moldings. Use water to mist the debris on layers of paper and plastic drop cloths underfoot before carefully folding them, dirty side inward. Tape all edges shut or seal in heavy-duty trash bags for disposal. Vacuum the entire work area with a vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter to pick up any dust and debris. Wipe surfaces with a damp cloth or sponge and a household detergent; empty the dirty rinse water into a container, never a sink, bathtub, or toilet.

Check with your town about hazardous-waste collection programs. Give the surfaces and any uncarpeted floors a final wipedown with a clean, damp cloth. Skip to main content. Sign up today for our FREE email newsletters and get helpful tips delivered to your email inbox. Now trending on TOH. More From TOH.

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In this tutorial, We'll show you our step by step process of how to easily and efficiently strip a dining room table. The label is almost always wrong and suggests you wait too long! I have been refinishing furniture for almost 30 years now. To protect yourself when using any stripper, use an organic solvent respirator with new filters, splashproof goggles, chemical-resistant gloves, and an apron. Once the paint is off, you'll need to rinse off any remaining stripper; otherwise, the chemical residue will react with the new finish. To darken the light boards without overdarkening the adjoining wood, Maxwell made two blends of stain—one taken at full strength straight from the can and a second that he thinned with a splash of mineral spirits.

How to strip a painted table

How to strip a painted table

How to strip a painted table. TOH Network

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How to Easily Remove Paint & Varnish from Old Furniture! – Our Home Made Easy

Sometimes ugly is only skin deep. Getting under those layers of old paint might reveal a valuable piece of furniture. After the stripper is brushed on, chemicals do the hard work. There's probably an old dresser, chair, or table you've sequestered in a dark corner of your basement or attic that's covered with cracked and blistered paint. Whether the piece is a family heirloom or just something you picked up at a garage sale, you can remove the paint and turn it into a usable piece of furniture.

Chemical stripping surely ranks as one of the messiest ways to spend a weekend. But if you follow the advice of Don Maxwell, of Maxwell's Furniture Restoration in Mountainside, New Jersey, on how to redo furniture you will get the job done safely and correctly.

Who knows? You might find a real gem under all that gunk. What will you save doing the work yourself? Fix It First When restoring furniture, it helps to break things down to smaller, more manageable steps. First, remove hardware, such as pulls, knobs, and hinges.

Maxwell suggests writing numbers on the parts or even taking a few "before" pictures to help with reassembly when you're done. If the piece is damaged, fix it before removing the paint.

For this project, Maxwell started by removing the split tabletop. The fastest way to correct splits like these is to recut and reglue the joint. Maxwell ran the top through his tablesaw, cleaned up the cut on his jointer and installed a few wood biscuits to reinforce the joint and straighten any minor warping. Next, he brushed on a thin coat of carpenter's glue and clamped the boards together. Once the glue dried, the table was shipped to the stripping room.

Some pros dunk pieces in a vat of chemicals. According to Maxwell, stripping furniture is best done by hand. So if you do decide to have a pro do the work, look for a shop that does the work by hand. Before you begin stripping, you'll need the proper safety equipment and a few tools.

To protect yourself when using any stripper, use an organic solvent respirator with new filters, splashproof goggles, chemical-resistant gloves, and an apron. To lather the stripper, Maxwell cuts down natural-bristle paintbrushes.

Less expensive synthetic brushes work with some water-based strippers but, says Maxwell, "they turn to pulp the second they touch solvent. Maxwell uses metal scrapers and steel wool, but if you're using a water-based chemical, use plastic knives and abrasive pads; otherwise, metal particles will leave rust stains on the wood. Choose a well-ventilated spot when you work.

Because many chemicals in strippers are heavier than air, they will sink to the floor and can be difficult to get rid of, so basements are not a good choice. Some of the vapors can also corrode the metal parts of your furnace or water heater.

For maximum ventilation, Maxwell recommends working in the garage or, better yet, outside. Maxwell does his work on a lipped metal tray that collects the extra stripper into a paint can; he reuses the stripper until it evaporates. You can cover a worktable with several thick layers of newspaper, removing the top sheet as it gets caked up to expose a fresh working surface.

The speed of the stripping process depends upon the strength of the stripper and the stubbornness of the finish. On this table, the paint began to bubble and blister almost as soon as Maxwell brushed on a coat of the liquid-type stripper. The chemical breaks the bond between the wood and paint; most finishes will come off in sheets. For tough paints, Maxwell carefully scratches the surface of the finish to help the stripper get down to the wood.

If you find yourself prying or scraping off the finish though, put on more stripper or you'll damage the wood. To strip the flat top, Maxwell used a putty knife to remove the thick sludge, scrubbed the surface with coarse steel wool and finished up with a second dose of stripper. Carvings and turnings require special attention. Maxwell prefers using a scrub brush to work the paint out of all the nooks and crannies on the legs, but coarse twine and wood shavings also work well.

For some vertical surfaces and difficult finishes, Maxwell will use a paste-type stripper. If the stripper dries, you can reactivate it by brushing on a little more, and then scraping it all off. Once the paint is off, you'll need to rinse off any remaining stripper; otherwise, the chemical residue will react with the new finish. Commercial stripper rinses are available, but Maxwell recommends denatured alcohol or mineral spirits.

Water-based strippers can be rinsed off with water but, he says, "the water will wind up raising the grain, which will mean more sanding later on. After it had thoroughly dried, Maxwell gave the table a finish sanding.

After starting with a power sander, he switched to a small cork-padded block. Maxwell also advises against too much sanding. After disassembling the table, Maxwell fixes a split by cutting through the crack with his tablesaw and regluing the joint. Once you've reached this point, you can decide how to finish the piece. The maple used on this table didn't quite match. To darken the light boards without overdarkening the adjoining wood, Maxwell made two blends of stain—one taken at full strength straight from the can and a second that he thinned with a splash of mineral spirits.

He brushed the full-strength stain on the lighter wood, then switched to the thinned stain to finish the top. Once the stain dries, any additional stain will make the wood look like a darker second coat. Maxwell stained the edges after blending the top. To control the color, Maxwell uses a very dry brush and lightly touches the side of the bristles against the wood.

The final step is to apply a protective topcoat. Maxwell prefers the speed of a spray finish, but "choosing a finish is a balance between form and function," he says. In the case of an everyday piece, such as a kitchen table, a brush-on polyurethane would be an equally practical choice. With its new showroom finish, the table looks might look too good to eat off of, but there's no need to cover up the wood with a tablecloth.

Coarse steel wool or an abrasive pad are also good for scrubbing off stubborn paint. Most paint stores and home centers stock dozens of liquid- and paste-type chemical strippers. Basically, the three things you need to know are:. Fastest Most of the strippers in this category contain methylene chloride, which is also called dichloromethane, or DCM.

This chemical will soften almost any paint and finish instantly. These strippers work from the bottom up so that the finish comes off in sheets. The downside to DCM is that it's nasty stuff. In addition to being a possible carcinogen, methylene chloride can cause skin and lung irritation and exacerbate the symptoms of heart disease.

Inhaling it reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood, which can also mean a trip to the ER. In addition, it's difficult to detect when a respirator becomes ineffective. Medium-Fast These strippers contain smaller amounts of methylene chloride or other chemicals, such as methylpyrrolidone and gamma butyrolactone. These strippers aren't as toxic as the fastest strippers, but you'll still need to wear gloves and goggles, and most require additional ventilation.

Because these strippers work from the top down, you may need to apply a second coat when stripping furniture that's caked under several layers of paint.

Slowest This type can be used indoors without special ventilation, a respirator or gloves. The downside is that these strippers take as long as 24 hours to work and, because they're water-based, they will raise the grain and loosen veneers. Refinishers Despite what some labels suggest, refinishers, or removers, are strippers, although they only work on shellac or lacquer.

Refinishers liquefy these finishes on contact. Most refinishers contain either acetone or tolulene, so be sure to use gloves, goggles, and a respirator, and provide plenty of ventilation.

Box Memphis, TN www. Paul, MN Safest Stripper. Skip to main content. Sign up today for our FREE email newsletters and get helpful tips delivered to your email inbox. Introduction There's probably an old dresser, chair, or table you've sequestered in a dark corner of your basement or attic that's covered with cracked and blistered paint. Successful Stripping Some pros dunk pieces in a vat of chemicals. Tools You'll Need Before you begin stripping, you'll need the proper safety equipment and a few tools.

The Work Area Choose a well-ventilated spot when you work. Taking it off The speed of the stripping process depends upon the strength of the stripper and the stubbornness of the finish. Finishing Up Once you've reached this point, you can decide how to finish the piece. Shopping for Stripper Most paint stores and home centers stock dozens of liquid- and paste-type chemical strippers. With that in mind, here's a rundown of the four basic categories.

Examples: Citristrip, Olympic Slowest This type can be used indoors without special ventilation, a respirator or gloves. Example: Safest Stripper Refinishers Despite what some labels suggest, refinishers, or removers, are strippers, although they only work on shellac or lacquer. Where to Find It W. More in Furniture In this how-to video, This Old House plumbing and heating contractor Richard Trethewey explains how to revive an old How to Paint a Cast-Iron Radiator.

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How to strip a painted table