Male witchcraft involving anal sex-The Arcane Archive - Anal Sex

Sex magic or sexual magic or sex magick is a term used for various types of sexual activity used in magical , theurgical or other religious and spiritual pursuits. The level of energy generated by sexual arousal is claimed by its practitioners to create very powerful magic. In Wicca , for example, the Great Rite involves either ritual sexual intercourse between the High Priest and High Priestess, or a ritual symbolic representation of sexual intercourse. In the symbolic version, the High Priest plunges the athame or ritual knife, the male symbol into a cup or chalice the female symbol filled with wine and held by the High Priestess. The Great Rite symbolizes creation in the union of the Maiden Goddess with the Lover God, and thus is also considered a fertility rite, and is often performed during the festival of Beltane.

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Now, there is another layer to the hidden meaning of kula. Curwen undoubtedly knew more about these matters than did Crowley. But it is Crowley and Crowley's form of sexual magic that most Westerners readers now think of when they hear the word Tantra. Front matter. Witchcraft Across the World — Americas January 8, In AugustJohn Samond was indicted again for witchcraft.

Tori spelling upskirt. Black Witch: “Bedknobs and Broomsticks” (Paganism & Sex)

Covens almost always keep a similar group book. Majorica man made pearl necklace is the intent Teria reid naked your actions and spirituality that matters in the end. But above all else, modern-day witchcraft is about empowerment. If and Male witchcraft involving anal sex a Witch does zap someone, they do so with the full knowledge that it will eventually return to them and there will be a price to pay according to the Law of Three. Wicca, in particular, extends that possession to sexual acts, whether literal or metaphorical," he goes on to say that by making sex sacred, "Wiccans in all countries set their own stamp on nature religion, uniting in their bodies the cosmic and the most personal energies of planetary Male witchcraft involving anal sex. It's not transphobic to say this and that men deserve no acceptance in something women were persecuted and in some areas still are. This practice has its history in a couple of different things, none of which have anything to do with evil Throw in some lavender or ylang ylang for a lil flowery smell if ur into that. Witch is a gender neutral term. The Message of the Cross of Christ? No, although women do seem to predominate in the Craft overall. Since Witchcraft teaches that whatever one sends out is returned threefold, Witches are very careful to never send out harmful energy carelessly. The Kama Sutra wasn't just a sex manual but a sex magyc.

Hugh Urban.

  • Helping You Live a Magical Life!
  • Originally posted by sionevada.
  • At some point during your studies of modern Paganism, you'll probably run across references to ritual sex, including - but certainly not limited to - the Great Rite.
  • This is an interior page of the Spells and Witchcraft.
  • Sex magic or sexual magic or sex magick is a term used for various types of sexual activity used in magical , theurgical or other religious and spiritual pursuits.

Sex magic or sexual magic or sex magick is a term used for various types of sexual activity used in magical , theurgical or other religious and spiritual pursuits. The level of energy generated by sexual arousal is claimed by its practitioners to create very powerful magic. In Wicca , for example, the Great Rite involves either ritual sexual intercourse between the High Priest and High Priestess, or a ritual symbolic representation of sexual intercourse.

In the symbolic version, the High Priest plunges the athame or ritual knife, the male symbol into a cup or chalice the female symbol filled with wine and held by the High Priestess. The Great Rite symbolizes creation in the union of the Maiden Goddess with the Lover God, and thus is also considered a fertility rite, and is often performed during the festival of Beltane.

Temple prostitution was still being carried on in the Phoenician cities of Aphaca and Heliopolis until closed down by the Emperor Constantine in the 4th Century A.

Sexual rites were a central although by no means the only element of traditional Indian Tantra beliefs, and were also present in some Buddhist and Ancient Egyptian religions.

The ceremonial sexual union of man and woman on the land as a fertility act to ensure a good crop and a rich harvest was common in many traditional cultures.

Western sex magic has its roots in Hebrew Kabbalah, and was spread further through several occult doctrines like those of the Knights Templar and the Freemasons.

Aleister Crowley was one of the first people in modern times to publicly advocate the practice of sexual magic. He rejected the prudish attitude of the Victorian era towards sex and took delight in shocking British society by explicitly including masturbation and homosexuality among his magical techniques.

He believed that the suppression of the sexual instinct was the root cause of the violence and other evils of the modern world. The Ordo Templi Orientis, an occult brotherhood founded by Karl Kellner and Theodor Reuss at the end of the 19th Century, had from its inception included the teaching of sex magic in the highest degree.

When Crowley became head of the British section of the Order in , he expanded on these teachings, associating the different techniques with different degrees of initiation e. He also composed one of the best-known O. Crowley wrote extensively on sex magic, some of which works were published and made available to the general public, others of which were secret and could only be obtained by initiates of O.

It can be implemented in a variety of ways such as written spells , dolls, charms or different rituals. Historically, love magic was often associated with prostitutes and courtesans, who were deemed to hold psychological power over their partners, and this sometimes led to dramatic measures such as witchcraft accusations and trials.

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Both men and women and non binary people! This simply makes the concept easier for the human mind to comprehend and relate to. A male Witch is simply called a Witch, never a warlock and it is considered an insult to call a male Witch "Warlock". At least as a solitary witch. You probably are too. Though practices may vary, most traditions have many similarities, such as the working of magick and a respect for nature.

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Male witchcraft involving anal sex

Male witchcraft involving anal sex. Get in touch

In Wicca , for example, the Great Rite involves either ritual sexual intercourse between the High Priest and High Priestess, or a ritual symbolic representation of sexual intercourse.

In the symbolic version, the High Priest plunges the athame or ritual knife, the male symbol into a cup or chalice the female symbol filled with wine and held by the High Priestess. The Great Rite symbolizes creation in the union of the Maiden Goddess with the Lover God, and thus is also considered a fertility rite, and is often performed during the festival of Beltane.

Temple prostitution was still being carried on in the Phoenician cities of Aphaca and Heliopolis until closed down by the Emperor Constantine in the 4th Century A.

Sexual rites were a central although by no means the only element of traditional Indian Tantra beliefs, and were also present in some Buddhist and Ancient Egyptian religions. The ceremonial sexual union of man and woman on the land as a fertility act to ensure a good crop and a rich harvest was common in many traditional cultures. Western sex magic has its roots in Hebrew Kabbalah, and was spread further through several occult doctrines like those of the Knights Templar and the Freemasons.

Aleister Crowley was one of the first people in modern times to publicly advocate the practice of sexual magic. He rejected the prudish attitude of the Victorian era towards sex and took delight in shocking British society by explicitly including masturbation and homosexuality among his magical techniques. He believed that the suppression of the sexual instinct was the root cause of the violence and other evils of the modern world. The Ordo Templi Orientis, an occult brotherhood founded by Karl Kellner and Theodor Reuss at the end of the 19th Century, had from its inception included the teaching of sex magic in the highest degree.

When Crowley became head of the British section of the Order in , he expanded on these teachings, associating the different techniques with different degrees of initiation e. As time passes, I find myself increasingly drawing upon the wisdom and beliefs of other spiritual paths as my knowledge and understanding of them increases. So, when asked I'll tell you I'm a Witch, I also consider myself a Wiccan and perhaps part Shaman because I utilize and blend aspects of them all.

Who do Witches Worship? There is a single power defined as the One or All, which is composed of everything it has ever created. This supreme energy force does not rule over the Universe, it IS the Universe. Since most find it difficult to talk to or call upon a faceless mass of Divine energy, this supreme power is personified into male and female aspects as the Goddess and God. This simply makes the concept easier for the human mind to comprehend and relate to.

In the end, it is a personal preference and what a Witch uses depends on what "feels" right for them individually.

How do Witches view Christianity. Are Witches Anti-Christian? Not necessarily. Witchcraft, overall, is very tolerant of other religious views, and does not engage itself in criticizing the beliefs of other people, providing that their beliefs do not violate the basic tenant of "Harm None.

This is why there is a slight rub between Wiccans, Pagans, Witches, and some Christians. Many of them feel they have exclusive rights to the divine.

We also have a strong disdain for those who use religion as an excuse to commit mass genocide. The "Burning Times" are a clear historical example of one religious group attempting to exert its philosophies and beliefs upon others using extreme measures. Perhaps an over simplified way of describing our view is this: Imagine a beautiful meadow in the forest, and their are many paths leading to this meadow. It really does not matter which path you take to get there, the important thing is that you get there without harming anyone or anything along the way.

Can I follow the path of Wicca or Witchcraft and be a Christian too? Again, some say yes and others maintain that they are completely separate religions. I believe that if one looks closely at the true teachings of Jesus with an open heart, you will find some stark commonalities. It is only when one takes literally the sometimes frail misinterpretations of those who misunderstood the intent or used the teachings to suit their own political agendas that one see's wide differences.

As a solitary you are free to choose any path you desire, or any blend that "feels" right to you. The important thing is to not allow a name or word to become a stumbling block. It is the intent of your actions and spirituality that matters in the end.

I realize it is a poor comparison; Peanut Butter and Chocolate are two completely separate things. The fact remains, however, that they work pretty well when mixed together. Ultimately you must do what "feels" right to you The Wiccan Rede says "An it harm none, do as ye will. An excellent question indeed!

The whole premise of our belief system is based on living in harmony with all things that exist. This includes, but is not limited to the earth, trees, rivers, lakes, oceans, air, and all of earth's creatures, as well as other people without regard to race, color, religion, or sexual orientation. My interpretation of the Rede tells me that the creative force of the universe has given me an inner voice, or "conscience," which tells me what is right or wrong.

It is also this consciousness that connects me to the creator. By listening to this inner voice, Perhaps I should clarify here. If they are, I try to put them in perspective or discard them all together. I then use common sense and judgment in my actions and accept full responsibility for them.

This is not always easy to do, but I try. By keeping these ideals of right and wrong foremost in my mind, as well as seeking to obtain harmony and balance with nature and all living things, I am able to do my best at following the Rede as I go through my day.

This is not to say that Witches are perfect, never do anything wrong, or make mistakes. We are still human. We are aware of, or try to be aware of the karmic return of our actions, and are very careful not to send out negative energy in thought or deed.

Yes, sometimes a Witch will focus an energy form toward someone who needs a psychic zap. This is only done however when a person is consistently doing something very wrong within society and causing a lot of harm to others. If and when a Witch does zap someone, they do so with the full knowledge that it will eventually return to them and there will be a price to pay according to the Law of Three. There are times when we simply must make a personal sacrifice for the good of the whole and shoulder this weight.

When confronted with this type of situation, I prefer to bring this person to the attention of the Goddess, asking her that justice be done according to her will. In this way I am not focusing negative energy towards the individual and therefore am less likely to suffer karmic repercussions. If Wicca and Witchcraft are not evil, why do you wear black robes?

This is another baseless superstition and Witches wear clothing and robes of every color. Black is the combination of all colors and all vibrational rates of light on the material plane.

It is known that black is a very good conductor of energy, therefore wearing black simply helps Witches absorb natural energy to increase the power of their thought forms. Personally, I do my Magickal work naked. Gawd, there's an ugly visualization for ya! OK, so if Wicca and Witchcraft are not evil, why do you hold rituals and ceremonies at night hidden in the woods?

This practice has its history in a couple of different things, none of which have anything to do with evil In the old world, especially within the Celtic tribes, the day followed an entirely different schedule than it does in modern times. The new day for them actually began at sunset. This is also why most observances of holidays were celebrated on the evening before the actual calendar day.

The second reason is that survival had an entirely different meaning during those times. Almost without exception, everyone spent their daylight hours tending the crops, their herds, or engaged in their trade. All daylight hours were vitally important simply for survival reasons.

OK, so that takes care of why we observed our rites at night during ancient times, and many of the reasons are the same in today's times. For one, most of us are busy working all day earning a living, so the evening is the only time we have to seek spiritual communion. Secondly, Wicca and Witchcraft are still largely misunderstood religions and we are still persecuted for our beliefs.

Another reason which is important for me, and possibly for others as well is that I feel a special closeness to the Goddess and God at night. Yes I can, and do, enjoy the mountains and meadows during the daylight, or a sunrise and sunset, but I am truly more aware of the heavens and the great expanse of the Universe at night, so it just makes sense for me. What form does the practice of Witchcraft take? The form and context vary from group to group, and between each ritual, and may run the gamut from elaborate ceremony to spontaneous ritual to simple meditation.

How do you see the Goddess and God? See Before Time Was or read the answer to question number two above again for more insight. Do all Witches practice their religion the same way? Yes and no. Wicca is a highly individualistic religion. Moreover, the number of different sects within the Craft may give the impression that no two groups practice the same way.

Though practices may vary, most traditions have many similarities, such as the working of magick and a respect for nature. Most Witches find enough common ground for mutual support and productive networking throughout the Craft community. Is Witchcraft a cult? Cults are groups that trade a sense of salvation and belonging for the ability to think for oneself.

They indulge in extravagant homage or adoration Webster's Dictionary , usually of an earthly leader of some sort. If you know a real Witch, you'll quickly come to find the term "Cult" could not apply to us.

Most Wiccans, Witches and pagans come to the Craft individually through reading and communing with nature. They often will remain solitary in their beliefs but other will also find like-minded people to celebrate seasonal cycles or monthly moons with. Witches are extremely individualistic, self sufficient and defend the right of free will without hesitation.

Do Witches have a bible? A bible is supposedly the word of a deity revealed through a prophet. Witchcraft is a Pagan folk-religion of personal experience.

Witchcraft in the old times was much the same as the beliefs of the Essenes, Gnostics, Druids, and many other religions. The teachings were passed along by spoken word through long periods of one-on-one instruction with an Elder of the Craft.

Secondary targets? Male witches on trial in: Male witches in early modern Europe

The prevailing view in witchcraft studies is that male witches were rare exceptions to the rule and are less important and interesting, as historical subjects, than female witches.

This chapter examines cases in which men were accused of witchcraft. The examples are drawn from several different regions, in order to test conventional generalisations about male witches. Quaife exemplifies scholars' difficulty in coming to grips with the fact of male witches. He actually suggests that the male witches were merely 'secondary targets as husbands or associates of a female witch'. Discounting all secondary targets would alter the statistical picture significantly.

Quaife, however, avoids this result by constructing a double standard, which presupposes, by implication, that early modern Europeans did not 'mean it' when they accused men of being witches but were serious when they accused women. As the previous chapter showed, the prevailing view in witchcraft studies is that male witches were rare exceptions to the rule and are less important and interesting, as historical subjects, than female witches.

There is a kind of conventional historiographical wisdom about male witches, which may be summarised as follows: male witches were a accused in small numbers; b accused primarily because they were related to female witches; c accused primarily in large witch-hunts, in which panic broke down the stereotype of the female witch; d not accused of diabolic witchcraft, especially the sexual aspects; e accused in larger numbers in areas where witchcraft was treated primarily as heresy rather than as maleficium ; f accused of different types of witchcraft from that of female witches.

These generalisations are rarely questioned, despite the fact that they are derived, for the most part, from the early regional studies by Monter, Midelfort, and Macfarlane rather than from comparative analyses. Whereas almost everything else, it seems, about witchcraft and witch-hunting especially anything to do with women has been dissected under many different microscopes, these hypotheses regarding male witches, put forward in the s, have been absorbed as comfortable verities and allowed to stand virtually untested.

Examining a few cases is not the same thing as a comprehensive comparative analysis, and one must be wary of merely replacing old generalisations with new ones; however, the examples discussed in this chapter indicate clearly that the conventional wisdom regarding male witches is faulty on empirical grounds and fails utterly to account for the complexity of witchcraft cases involving men.

This figure represents an estimate that covers continental Europe, the British Isles, and the American colonies, over a period of roughly three hundred years: it masks the crucial fact that ratios of male to female witches were extremely variable.

The following table illustrates this variability between regions. Similar tables can be found in many studies.

Our purpose is different, and we have designed our table accordingly. We have omitted the usual column listing the percentage of female witches, in favour of one listing the percentage of male witches. The arrangement of data is also somewhat unusual. Instead of grouping statistics by region or chronology, we have sorted them according to an ascending numerical order of the percentages of male witches. We have done this for two reasons: first, to highlight the range of percentages; second, and more importantly, to avoid, as far as possible, giving the false impression that the data sets are directly comparable.

As the second column shows,the chronological periods covered are too variable to allow a meaningful comparison of statistical data; in addition, the regions represented in this sample are very different, ranging from a city Venice to entire countries. Our sample is by no means intended to be exhaustive; therefore, we have not included totals.

The figures include men and women who were accused, indicted or tried for witchcraft. Witchcraft prosecutions by sex 2. Although it is difficult to draw certain kinds of specific conclusions from the comparison of such diverse data sets,several features stand out.

Finally, there were regions of Europe where men actually comprised the majority of those accused of witchcraft: Burgundy, Estonia, Normandy and Iceland.

Perhaps we could discount Iceland and Estonia as peripheral to European culture and therefore not representative of the whole; but what about Burgundy and Normandy? In any case, it is clear that any attempt to establish representativeness would be problematic. Is the Bishopric of Basel really more representative of gendered patterns of witch-hunting than Iceland, because it tried so many more women than men? In his discussion of the gender bias of witch hunts, Quaife explains male witches away as the political opponents of prosecutors; as cunningmen; or as relatives of female suspects.

Discounting these men,he argues,raises the proportion of women in the New England trials to almost 90 per cent, which, he says, corresponds neatly with the proportion in England. It was unusual for more than a small number of individuals to be accused as primary targets; the ordinary pattern for witch-hunts, including the New England trials, was for primary targets to accuse directly or implicate indirectly several secondary targets, including both male and female relatives and associates.

That Quaife is able to suggest this without providing any qualitative evidence of early modern beliefs about male witches indicates the power of statistical figures within witchcraft historiography. The point here is not to deny that,generally speaking,more women than men were accused of witchcraft. This is a central, indisputable feature of early modern witch-hunting that cannot be ignored. Nevertheless, it is a feature that is far from uniform, and that lack of uniformity must be taken into account in analyses of gender and witchcraft in early modern Europe.

One means of accomplishing this goal is to make the men accused of witchcraft visible through specific case studies. Our first case study comes from the county of Essex in England. This is problematic because the indictments, which provide the bulk of the evidence for any interpretations of witchcraft in Essex, contain little in the way of detailed information about individual cases.

In some instances, it is possible to work out who was most likely to have been accused first. For example, in August Richard Presmary and his wife Joan were indicted and convicted at the Chelmsford Assizes on the charge of murder by witchcraft.

Joan Presmary had been indicted for witchcraft in the previous year, at the Brentwood Assizes of July It seems reasonable that in this case Joan Presmary may have been accused first, because she would have had a reputation as a witch. This tells us nothing about why Richard Presmary would have been accused this time,but it does appear to support the suggestion that men were secondary suspects.

On the other hand, in many cases there is no way of knowing, from the indictments, who was accused first. William and Margery Skelton, a couple from Little Wakering, were indicted and convicted on multiple counts of murder by witchcraft at the Chelmsford Assizes of March Neither one appears to have had previous indictments.

This case is especially interesting because the four murders are divided up evenly between the couple: William bewitched one girl, Margery bewitched another, and the couple committed the remaining murders together.

The case of John Samond, however, suggests that it was equally possible for men to be suspected independently; furthermore, this case suggests that women may at times have been the secondary suspects. John Samond, also known as Smythe, Smith, or Salmon, first appears in the Essex indictment records in July , three years before the Witchcraft Statute of was passed.

He was acquitted the following year, at the Chelmsford Assizes of March Samond is an important figure because his frequent appearances in the indictment records allow us to compare his charges with those of the women indicted at the same assizes. His indictments demonstrate that, contrary to some of the generalisations described at the beginning of this chapter, men could be accused of witchcraft independently of their female relatives and were not always accused of practising magic that was different from that of women.

Indeed, the striking thing about John Samond, besides his frequent appearances before the assizes, is that there is no clear distinction between him and the female witches indicted in Essex.

In , at the time of his first indictment, Samond was a beer-brewer with a reputation. The indictment states that. John Samond of Danbury…, beer-brewer, otherwise called John Smythe,is a common enchanter and witch as well of men as beasts … not having God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, by the devilish arts of enchantment and witchcraft, on 28 May, 1 Eliz.

And the said Antony Grant … from the 28 May in the year above said until the 28 May next following did languish, on which day the said Antony … died. There is no explanation of why or how he bewitched his victims, but this is normal for indictments, which are very terse documents. If English people believed that there was an essential distinction between male and female witches as witches , this is not reflected in their legal language.

He was accused of stealing sheep from two other men, found guilty, but allowed benefit of clergy. In August , John Samond was indicted again for witchcraft. This time, he is listed as a yeoman and beer-brewer, and his wife Joan is indicted with him. This case is important for what it suggests — or, more precisely, for what it does not suggest — regarding the relationship between male witches and their wives.

We have seen that modern scholars tend to assume a causal relationship in which the man is accused because of his association with a female witch.

Although there is not enough information given in the indictments to say with any certainty what the background to this case was, it seems unlikely that suspicion of Joan Samond would have led to suspicion against her husband, instead of the other way around. Furthermore, the charges themselves suggest that suspicion may have fallen on John first. The first charge against John Samond is for bewitching to death two cows belonging to William Treasure. This is the most recent of the three bewitchings listed in the indictment and, significantly, Treasure had given evidence against Samond in the sheep-stealing case.

Treasure may have suspected an act of revenge and accused John Samond; the other charges against John and his wife maiming one man and laming another may have been brought forward subsequently.

Two other witchcraft cases at this session show that the type of charges against John Samond were not gender-specific. Three women, indicted at the same assizes,were charged with killing livestock and a person by witchcraft. The main difference between Samond and the women accused of witchcraft at the same assizes is that the women except for his own wife were generally found guilty, while he was acquitted.

It is tempting to conclude that Samond was acquitted because he was a man; however, it is important to remember that conviction rates for witchcraft in England were relatively low for both women and men. On the Home Circuit, fewer than half of the witchcraft indictments resulted in convictions,and only 22 per cent of those indicted were executed. Samond was tried before a grand jury, found guilty, and sentenced to be hanged. At the same session, two women were also indicted for witchcraft: they were acquitted.

There is simply not enough information in the indictments to enable us to say with any certainty why he was finally convicted in We cannot know,and in that sense John Samond does not help us establish explanatory models; but then, that is why he is so valuable. Samond is almost as much of a nuisance to modern scholars looking for patterns as he was to his community of Danbury. He muddles the patterns,and in doing so forces us to re-examine our assumptions about both male and female witches.

From to , a wave of witch trials rolled across the prince-bishopric of Augsburg. Although both men and women were accused during the course of the trials, all of those executed in the district of Rettenberg, except for Stoeckhlin, were women.

This case appears, on the surface, to reflect a simple anti-female dynamic. Several women were burned at the stake on the word of a man, and those men who were also accused managed to escape the fire. Wolfgang Behringer, whose microhistory of Chonrad Stoeckhlin provides the basis for this discussion, suggests, plausibly, that the court accepted accusations against women more readily than accusations against men, and that men were more likely to flee when they were accused.

The case of Chonrad Stoeckhlin is significant, however, precisely because the trials at Rettenberg were so biased against women. In a context that appears almost uniformly misogynist, Stoeckhlin, like John Samond,confuses the pattern and forces us to ask more questions about the relationship of gender to witch trials and contemporary knowledge about witches.

Also like Samond, Stoeckhlin fails on several counts to fit the model of the male witch constructed by modern scholars. He was accused independently of a close female relative there was a connection with a female relative, but not in a way which conforms to the model: see note 43 ; he was accused at the very beginning of a witch panic, not in its later stages; and he was accused of the most stereotypical elements of witchcraft: the pact with the Devil, night flight to the Sabbath, and sexual intercourse with the Devil.

How did Stoeckhlin become a witch? His complex path to the stake has been reconstructed by Wolfgang Behringer from the court records of his trial. Born in , Chonrad Stoeckhlin was the horse wrangler of Oberstdorf, a position of responsibility and considerable status. He inherited his position as horse wrangler when his father went blind in His mother died in , a year of famine. Stoeckhlin and his family were not wealthy, but they seem to have been comfortable: they had a house and were able to keep a cow in the wintertime.

In February , Stoeckhlin and his friend Jacob Walch, an oxherd, spent an evening drinking wine and talking about death and the afterlife. In addition to his responsibilities as a herdsman, Stoeckhlin was a healer.

He became a witch-finder: he named the witches responsible for injuries and sicknesses, and knew how to force them, ritually, to undo their evil magic.

Male witchcraft involving anal sex